Post Wedding Checklist

Change Your Name (If You Choose)

You should change all your IDs within 90 days.
1. Driver’s license – Might need to bring a copy of your marriage certificate to the DMV.
2. Passport – Go to Travel.State.gov for more info. You’ll need to send in a current passport, a photocopy of your marriage certificate, and possibly new passport photos.
3. Social Security Card – Check out SocialSecurity.gov to see how. You may need to apply in person.
4. Credit Cards – Call them all, blah.

Tax Forms

Now is the time to decide if you will file together or continue to file separate. You may want to consult and accountant or your tax preparer for advice.

Finances

Hopefully this one was covered before you two walked own the isle. You could do a joint account, as well as, two separate accounts. Decide who is responsible for what bills, etc.

More Legalities

You will want to think about health insurance coverage, changing beneficiaries etc. If one of your employers offer better health insurance, you might consider adding the other. Make sure both your doctors take that insurance. Now you can also look into plans through the government’s Health Insurance Marketplace at HealthCare.gov regardless of your medical history. Most newlyweds also make their spouse the beneficiary on life insurance docs.  A new Will should eventually be drawn up as well.

Thank-You Notes

Get those Thank You notes out within two months of your wedding! It may be best to set a goal of 5 to 10 every night. Your spouse could concentrate on their side of the family or friends. Be sure you both sign every one before they go out, not just one of you.

Registry Returns

Return all those nice gifts that you don’t need. Be sure to check the return policy and get it done with plenty of time to spare

Clean and Store Your Gown

Be sure to dry-clean your dress within six months of the wedding. Look for a service that specializes in wedding dresses so they use the right solvents. Make sure they stuff it with acid-free tissue, and store at home in a cool, dry place.

Photo by Erin Johnson Photography